STINKHORN MUSHROOM JUICE:
LATVIAN FOLK REMEDY
SHOWS PROMISE AGAINST CANCER

From The Cancer Chronicles #17
© Sept. 1993 by Ralph W. Moss, Ph.D.

I FIND THE WHOLE SUBJECT OF MUSHROOMS AND CANCER ENDLESSLY FASCINATING. UNFORTUNATELY, I DO NOT KNOW A SOURCE FOR THIS PROMISING TREATMENT. --ED.

Succus Phallus impudicus sounds like ancient Roman graffitti. Actually, it means "juice of the Stinkhorn mushroom," a non-poisonous variety of the order Gasteromycetes.

A Stinkhorn is hard to miss: it has a "impudent" phallic shape, ill-smelling fruiting body and produces the odor of ripe garbage. This attracts flies, which then spread the mushroom's spores. Stinkhorns can emerge from an underground "egg" and burst open within an hour, "becoming slimy and fetid at maturity," according to the Encyclopedia Britannica.

Stinkhorns are a folk remedy against cancer in Eastern Europe. Juice is obtained by fermenting the fruiting body by the Filatov method, perfected in Latvia. This juice (abbreviated SPh) has been found to contain polysaccharides, phenol-carbolic acids and various nutrients.

Recent Latvian experiments show that SPh enhances the activity of natural killer (NK) cells, important in the defense against cancer. In studies on the standard Sarcoma 180 and Ehrlich ascites cancers, it inhibited tumor growth by 82% and 68%, respectively. When mice were given Stinkhorn mushroom juice to drink, it prolonged their life:

Effects of Stinkhorn Mushroom
Juice concentration 0% 25% 50% 100%
Life prolongation 0% 20% 60% 100%

In another experiment, it was found that injecting the juice just beneath the skin had an "immunizing" effect. On the 15th day of this experiment, the tumors in the treated group were 54% smaller than in the control group.

In a prevention experiment, Stinkhorn juice given orally to virgin mice inhibited spontaneous adenocarcinomas of the breast. The application of 0.2 ml (10 ml/kg) per day prevented the development of tumors in 100% of the animals. Lesser amounts of juice were less effective. In mice used for breeding (non-virgin mice), where 100 percent of the animals normally develop cancer, tumors were prevented in 90% of the animals by giving the same dose of Stinkhorn juice. The average life span was doubled.

Works Well With Chemotherapy

SPh also reduced the blood-marrow-destroying effects of the standard anti-cancer drug, 5-FU. For example, when mice were given 5-FU, it took their red blood cells 9-11 days to return to normal. But this time was reduced to just 3-4 days when they also got the mushroom juice.

In Latvia, human experiments are underway using SPh in conjunction with other treatments, for sarcomas, carcinomas of the stomach and breast cancer, according to Dr. Sergejs Kuznetsovs, of the research group Stimuls, Latvian Medical Academy, Riga, who presented these results to the 18th International Congress of Chemotherapy in July.


Ralph W. Moss, Ph.D. is director of the The Moss Reports for cancer patients. Dr. Moss is the author of eleven books and three documentaries on cancer-related topics. He is or has been an advisor on alternative cancer treatments to the National Institutes of Health, the National Cancer Institute, the American Urological Association, Columbia University, the University of Texas, the Susan G. Komen Foundation and the German Society of Oncology. He wrote the first article on alternative medicine for the Encyclopedia Britannica yearbook. He is listed in Marquis Who's Who in America, Who's Who in the World, Who's Who in the East, and Who's Who in Entertainment (as a film documentarian). This Web site does not advocate any particular treatment for cancer. We urge you to always seek competent medical advice for all health problems, especially cancer. Before consulting our site please read our full Disclaimer statement.



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